/ 2020 / Nature / Wildlife

Colossal Shadows: Super Tuskers of East Africa

  • Prize
    Gold in Nature/Wildlife
  • Company
    Drew Doggett Photography
  • Photographer
    Drew Doggett
  • Credit
    Drew Doggett

There are only an estimated 24 super tusk elephants left on Earth. These giants appear pulled from the pages of a bygone era, nearly out of place in today’s day and age. That they still roam the Earth after all this time is nothing short of miraculous since the market for their ivory has pushed them to the brink of extinction. With tusks weighing 100 pounds each or grazing the ground, these elephants are one of the most incredible sights on Earth. Within the animal kingdom, they are also important keepers of knowledge necessary for the development of future generations of tuskers.

Drew Doggett has made a name for himself in the documentary and fine art world with his photography of some of the planet’s most unique and isolated indigenous cultures.

His 2009 solo trip to the isolated Himalayan area of Humla, Nepal, resulted in a book, Slow Road to China, and six gallery exhibitions in New York, Nashville, and Washington, D.C. Omo: Expressions of a People, a collection of photographs from Ethiopia, is the second of several expeditions Doggett has planned as part of this ten-year project.

Trained in fashion photography, Doggett creates images that capture a larger, perhaps classical, idea of beauty—one that speaks to worlds beyond the immediate context of his subjects. His photography of these traditional communities encourages Western viewers of all ages to draw links between seemingly disparate cultures. The interaction of landscape and human physicality is a particular focus of his work.

Since 2009, Doggett has incorporated a philanthropic element into his artistic pursuits with Art Cares. Thanks to this non-profit project, proceeds from the book and fine art prints of Slow Road to China have already funded all operations at a health center in rural Nepal for a year.

In 2012, the Omo collection was accepted into the Smithsonian African Art Museum’s photographic archives.